Lessons Learned From C2E2, Part 2

Now that the con is over and I’m back to the real world, here are a couple more hints, tricks and lessons to maximize your con-going experience.  I had a lovely weekend and can’t wait for next year – C2E2 is one of the best cons I’ve been to for a lot of reasons, and from what I can tell, that’s not going to change any time soon.

(Read Part 1 here!)

5. Pay attention to social media

When I’m going to a con that I know Gail Simone will be at, my priorities for what I want to see are usually: 1. Any panel she’s speaking on; 2. everything else.  So it behooves me to check her twitter feed occasionally, because Simone uses it to announce what panels she’ll be on and to promote panels she’s attending.  This is important because the con schedule doesn’t always have a complete list of the guests that will be speaking: as far as I knew, Simone had one panel on Friday and that was it (the panel was on Dynamite Comics and their upcoming projects, and if you’re not excited about the Aliens/Vampirella crossover happening, I don’t think I want to know you). If I hadn’t checked twitter on Saturday morning, I wouldn’t have known that she would ALSO be sitting on a panel on the Trickle-Down Theory of Diversity (which I had had on my schedule but was ready to bump to see a Scott Snyder Q&A). I’m not saying you should spend the whole con on your phone, but there will be updates and changes that will impact your schedule, and social media provides a really convenient tool for keeping track of them.

6. Plan time to eat

Frequently what happens to me is that I’ll realize I’ve planned panels back-to-back-to-back, and haven’t left myself any gaps to get food or even just to rest my brain for a while. Cons are strenuous! You need time to recharge, relax, and eat in order to maximize your enjoyment of the experience. Prioritize your events, or, if you absolutely cannot miss something, plan ahead and pack your lunch. Note that this might involve looking up whether the convention allows outside food (some don’t; McCormick Place does).

7. Stick to your budget

I have trouble with this one, but I’m getting better. The thing about cons you want to go to is that they’re usually full of things you like, including art, books, merch and other swag. Unless you have unlimited resources (I do not), it’s good to decide your budget BEFORE getting to the exhibit hall, and making the effort to stick to it. How I manage it, is I withdraw in cash the amount I’ve decided is my budget for the weekend, and once that’s gone, that’s it! Remember that you’ll have to plan for things like food, parking, beverages, and other unexpected expenses. (Also remember that if you’re getting signatures and sketches in the artists’ alley, that it’s a good idea to tip if you’re not buying other merchandise.)

I was holding off on posting this to think up a couple more bullet points, but honestly, going to cons doesn’t have to be that complicated! Pick some stuff you like, try something new, be flexible. Remember to plan for downtime, keep your eye on the schedule for changes, and remember: anything you miss you can probably read about online.

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